Monday, 6 May 2013

Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy

The completed figure of Charles the Bold, the command figure for my Burgundian Ordonnance army.




He wears a fully gilded harness in the 'german' style and carries a baton bearing a fleur-de-lys - see the previous posting for the conversion work that Oliver of Steel Fist Miniatures has done on this figure. His horse bears the arms of Burgundy, which took some time to paint panel by panel.




I chose to paint the chain mail as steel, although examples of gilded mail do exist. This was partly based on The Last Judgement painting by Petrus Christus, which portrays gilded plate harness with steel mail, and as it creates some visual contrast. I'm happier with the tones for the gilded armour than those I'd previously been using - the base colour is Vallejo Air Colour Bright Brass. I've then washed over a thin mix of GW black and brown washes. The Bright Brass was then painted over as a highlight, with a final highlight - used sparingly to just pick out the highest points on the armour - of Vallejo Model Colour Gold.



I've added a mace to be carried from the saddle. Having initially thought that it would be slung from the wrist strap on the saddle,  but logically that would hit into the horse's flanks when moving at any speed. I then realised how few contemporary illustrations I could find on the web and in books of maces and axes being carried as the secondary weapon to a lance, prior to use, even when stretching my search to the early 16th century.  I found this one interesting one below (and another late 15th century Flemish painting I couldn't copy) which show a mace attached at it's head by a metal ring to the saddle. This appears to be a practical solution (even if rarely shown), so I've sought to replicate this. I'd be interested if anyone has any more info on this topic?



The figure of the duke will be part of a command base for a unit of mounted men at arms, representing household retainers. I've also completed a herald to accompany him. This is a Perry Minis Wars of the Roses range metal figure and horse. The only changes have been the addition of a feather on his hat and the tops of turned down riding boots, rather than the hose he's wearing.  I went for some contrasting (and simpler!) Burgundian devices on his tabard. 






A mounted standard bearer and a retainer on foot holding the duke's lance in readiness, are planned to complete this base.


22 comments:

  1. Those are immense, fantastic heraldry

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  2. Crazy amount of detail on the horse!

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  3. Outstanding work on these!

    I agree that some sensible way of securing hand weapons must have been used and the saddle ring seems an ideal and simple solution.

    I can't say that it's something I've come across before, or even considered though.

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  4. Absolutely amazing !!!

    Very impressive painting of the horse barding, just love it !!!

    Best regards Michael

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  5. Incredible brushwork!
    (I´ve still had no comeback about the windmill)

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  6. Yeah, have to agree on the barding, excellent job there.

    FMB

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  7. The Burgundian heraldry on the barding is fantastic and I love the converted Charles the Bold figure

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  8. Fantastic looking figures, very impressive!
    Phil.

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  9. Amazing painting job !!!!! Congratulations Master !

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  10. Excellent free hand work on all counts, very well done - does it make you yearn for a nice easy unit of infantry?

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    1. You bet - some 'simple' handgunners next I reckon!

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  11. My goodness me that is outstanding.

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  12. Absolutely stunning! The coat of arms is amazing.

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  13. Beautiful paintjob, setting the standard once again. I've seen a re-enactor employ a similar method for carrying his mace but this was attached to his belt; the medieval illustration seems a practical solution for holding the weapon.

    Regards,
    Matt

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  14. Very, very impressive. The barding is a beautiful piece of art, and the overall result is just stunning. My compliments!

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  15. Fab stuff yet again Simon and some handsome work on the heraldry.

    Have you come to a contrete conclusion as to how you will be basing them?

    Darrell.

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  16. wow, cracking work, some patience required for that effort!

    cheers
    Matt

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